katarina jerinic
studies in geology
proposals for...(temporary projects)
one step is 3.6 million miles
about
collaborations and contributions
sidewalk drawings
SIDEWALK DRAWINGS
signs and landmarks
the limits of topography
SIGNS AND LANDMARKS
THE LIMITS OF TOPOGRAPHY
neighborhood maps
erratic monument
VISITOR CENTER FOR ERRATIC MONUMENTS
HERE AND THERE
NEIGHBORHOOD MAPS
street signs became flags that mark mountaintops
STREET SIGNS BECAME FLAGS THAT MARK MOUNTAINTOPS

Views 1-12
2013
16 x 12 inches each
archival inkjet prints

While visiting Helsinki, ubiquitous utility pipes became instruments to view the near and far of an unfamiliar landscape surrounded by the sea.

 

beautification this sit
BEAUTIFICATION THIS SITE
HERE AND THERE

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A Sculpture Made By My Efforts
2013
20 x 30 inches
archival inkjet print

Beautification This Site centers on a leftover piece of the landscape that I recently acquired through the Department of Transportation’s Adopt-A-Highway Program. It’s located at exit 30 off the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway, carved out between a highway exit ramp and a congested Brooklyn street. Part public artwork, part self-assigned residency, the project calls attention to the land itself and ways it is shaped by urban bureaucratic and natural forces, passers-by, and my own endless efforts picking up trash, pulling weeds, and cutting the grass.

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Notes to self
2013
2 prints 12 x 16 inches each
archival inkjet prints

Desearía que estuvieras aquí / Wish you were here
2011
photograph and 4 free postcards
photograph: 13 x 19 inches, postcards: 4 x 6 inches and edition of 100 each
archival inkjet print, digital offset postcards, plastic bins


Through a photograph and a series of postcards, Wish you were here connects Red Hook, Brooklyn (my neighborhood) and Puerto Colombia (the town in Colombia where it was originally shown). The present of both places seems shaped by nostalgia for the past and isolation resulting from development. As in many of my projects, I use my everyday surroundings to invent explorations of places I have not visited.

Visitors to the exhibition in Puerto Colombia were invited to take postcards and send them back to me, particularly since the postcards were all printed with my address. I made a return postcard, which I sent to my new correspondents once I was back in Red Hook.

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Jeromesville, OH 44840
2010
archival inkjet print and postcard
13 x 19 inches and 4 x 6 inches

The Reanimation Library invited a group of artists and writers to respond to one of the most intriguing books in its collection: The Rand Corporation’s 1955 classic, A Million Random Digits with 100,000 Normal Deviates. When I opened the book, I landed on 44840. I sent a postcard from there.

reanimationlibrary.org
The Reanimation Library is a small, independent library based in Brooklyn. It is a collection of books that have fallen out of mainstream circulation. Outdated and discarded, they have been culled from thrift stores, stoop sales, and throw-away piles across the country and given new life as resource material for artists, writers, and other cultural archeologists.

gridspace.org
The purpose of GRIDSPACE is to provide an architecturally and sculpturally specific curatorial outlet that engages the rapidly changing neighborhood of northern Crown Heights. The non-traditional storefront gallery is in the front window of Charles Goldman’s studio. The “space” itself is a wooden grid of 12 individually lit 2 foot square by 8 inch deep “cubicles,” custom built to fit into the specially designed storefront.

CLOUD SHADOWS AND DRIFTING VAPORS
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Wanderings & Wonderings: Storm King by the Stars
2014
two-sided digital off-set print map and walking tour in July and October
Storm King Art Center, Mountainville, NY

Storm King Art Center, a sculpture park one hour north of New York City, invited artists to re-interpret the collection and grounds through a program called Wanderings & Wonderings. By using the stars as orientation points, visitors could navigate an unfamiliar landscape or navigate the landscape unfamiliarly. I modified the park map, projecting key navigational constellations visible in the July and October skies onto monumental site-specific sculptures and the earth below, transforming a walk through the park into two different celestial tours.