studies in geology
proposals for...(temporary projects)
one step is 3.6 million miles
collaborations and contributions
sidewalk drawings
SIDEWALK DRAWINGS
signs and landmarks
the limits of topography
STUDIES IN GEOLOGY
SIGNS AND LANDMARKS
CLOUD SHADOWS AND DRIFTING VAPORS
THE LIMITS OF TOPOGRAPHY
NEIGHBORHOOD MAPS
HERE AND THERE
VISITOR CENTER FOR ERRATIC MONUMENTS
erratic monument
here and there
neighborhood maps
STREET SIGNS BECAME FLAGS THAT MARK MOUNTAINTOPS
street signs became flags that mark mountaintops
beautification this sit
BEAUTIFICATION THIS SITE
CLOUD SHADOWS AND DRIFTING VAPORS
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Cloud Drift: Union Street Bridge, Gowanus Canal, Brooklyn, NY
2017
3 x 5 foot cyanotype flag on cotton

Cloud Drift is a series of cyanotype-image flags flown over the Gowanus Canal from June 21 - September 21, 2017 at each of its pedestrian crossings--on the bridges on Union, Carroll, Third and Ninth Streets in Brooklyn. Each flag features a photograph of the canal’s surface just below, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of surrounding skies, signs and structures. The flags are printed as 3 x 5 foot cyanotypes and attached to existing light posts. As each flag blows in the wind, their abstracted images o f the canal’s murky surface unfurl, transforming its dingy waters into sublimely cloudy skies.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the entire project. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones. While relatively stable, cyanotype images are still sensitive to ultra-violet light; by design, the flags’ images will fade over months in the summer sun.

 

Cloud Drift is presented by the New York City Department of Transportation's art program in partnership with Gowanus Souvenir Shop. Additional support provided by Baxter St at Camera Club of New York, Puffin Foundation, Gowanus Canal Conservancy, Jacquard Products, Brooklyn Microgrid and generous citizens of Brooklyn and beyond. Special thanks to the NYC Department of Design and Construction.

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Cloud Drift: Carroll Street Bridge, Gowanus Canal, Brooklyn, NY
2017
3 x 5 foot cyanotype flag on cotton

Cloud Drift is a series of cyanotype-image flags flown over the Gowanus Canal from June 21 - September 21, 2017 at each of its pedestrian crossings--on the bridges on Union, Carroll, Third and Ninth Streets in Brooklyn. Each flag features a photograph of the canal’s surface just below, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of surrounding skies, signs and structures. The flags are printed as 3 x 5 foot cyanotypes and attached to existing light posts. As each flag blows in the wind, their abstracted images o f the canal’s murky surface unfurl, transforming its dingy waters into sublimely cloudy skies.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the entire project. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones. While relatively stable, cyanotype images are still sensitive to ultra-violet light; by design, the flags’ images will fade over months in the summer sun.

 

Cloud Drift is presented by the New York City Department of Transportation's art program in partnership with Gowanus Souvenir Shop. Additional support provided by Baxter St at Camera Club of New York, Puffin Foundation, Gowanus Canal Conservancy, Jacquard Products, Brooklyn Microgrid and generous citizens of Brooklyn and beyond. Special thanks to the NYC Department of Design and Construction.

 

Cloud Drift: Third Street Bridge, Gowanus Canal, Brooklyn, NY
2017
3 x 5 foot cyanotype flag on cotton

Cloud Drift is a series of cyanotype-image flags flown over the Gowanus Canal from June 21 - September 21, 2017 at each of its pedestrian crossings--on the bridges on Union, Carroll, Third and Ninth Streets in Brooklyn. Each flag features a photograph of the canal’s surface just below, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of surrounding skies, signs and structures. The flags are printed as 3 x 5 foot cyanotypes and attached to existing light posts. As each flag blows in the wind, their abstracted images o f the canal’s murky surface unfurl, transforming its dingy waters into sublimely cloudy skies.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the entire project. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones. While relatively stable, cyanotype images are still sensitive to ultra-violet light; by design, the flags’ images will fade over months in the summer sun.

 

Cloud Drift is presented by the New York City Department of Transportation's art program in partnership with Gowanus Souvenir Shop. Additional support provided by Baxter St at Camera Club of New York, Puffin Foundation, Gowanus Canal Conservancy, Jacquard Products, Brooklyn Microgrid and generous citizens of Brooklyn and beyond. Special thanks to the NYC Department of Design and Construction.

 

Cloud Drift: Ninth Street Bridge, Gowanus Canal, Brooklyn, NY
2017
3 x 5 foot cyanotype flag on cotton

Cloud Drift is a series of cyanotype-image flags flown over the Gowanus Canal from June 21 - September 21, 2017 at each of its pedestrian crossings--on the bridges on Union, Carroll, Third and Ninth Streets in Brooklyn. Each flag features a photograph of the canal’s surface just below, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of surrounding skies, signs and structures. The flags are printed as 3 x 5 foot cyanotypes and attached to existing light posts. As each flag blows in the wind, their abstracted images o f the canal’s murky surface unfurl, transforming its dingy waters into sublimely cloudy skies.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the entire project. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones. While relatively stable, cyanotype images are still sensitive to ultra-violet light; by design, the flags’ images will fade over months in the summer sun.

 

Cloud Drift is presented by the New York City Department of Transportation's art program in partnership with Gowanus Souvenir Shop. Additional support provided by Baxter St at Camera Club of New York, Puffin Foundation, Gowanus Canal Conservancy, Jacquard Products, Brooklyn Microgrid and generous citizens of Brooklyn and beyond. Special thanks to the NYC Department of Design and Construction.

 

Cloudy #1, Gowanus Canal
2016
cyanotype on Arches hot press paper
10 x 13 1/2 inches

Cloud shadows and drifting vapors is a series of images about the surface of the Gowanus Canal, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of Brooklyn skies, signs and structures. As rendered in my upside down cyanotype photographs, a dingy urban landscape is transformed into images of sublimely cloudy skies. The series' title is taken from one of Asher B. Durand’s Letters on Landscape Painting, a sort of art and nature manifesto for the Hudson River School artists who lamented growing industrialization around the same time that the Gowanus Canal was taking shape.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the project, made on my regular walks over the canal. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century chemical and industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones—a distinction that is no longer possible, if it ever was.

Cloudy #2, Gowanus Canal
2016
cyanotype on Arches hot press paper
18 x 24 inches

Cloud shadows and drifting vapors is a series of images about the surface of the Gowanus Canal, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of Brooklyn skies, signs and structures. As rendered in my upside down cyanotype photographs, a dingy urban landscape is transformed into images of sublimely cloudy skies. The series' title is taken from one of Asher B. Durand’s Letters on Landscape Painting, a sort of art and nature manifesto for the Hudson River School artists who lamented growing industrialization around the same time that the Gowanus Canal was taking shape.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the project, made on my regular walks over the canal. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century chemical and industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones—a distinction that is no longer possible, if it ever was.

Cloudy #3, Gowanus Canal
2016
cyanotype on Arches hot press paper
10 x 13 1/2 inches

Cloud shadows and drifting vapors is a series of images about the surface of the Gowanus Canal, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of Brooklyn skies, signs and structures. As rendered in my upside down cyanotype photographs, a dingy urban landscape is transformed into images of sublimely cloudy skies. The series' title is taken from one of Asher B. Durand’s Letters on Landscape Painting, a sort of art and nature manifesto for the Hudson River School artists who lamented growing industrialization around the same time that the Gowanus Canal was taking shape.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the project, made on my regular walks over the canal. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century chemical and industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones—a distinction that is no longer possible, if it ever was.

Cloudy #4, Gowanus Canal
2016
cyanotype on Arches hot press paper
10 x 13 1/2 inches

Cloud shadows and drifting vapors is a series of images about the surface of the Gowanus Canal, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of Brooklyn skies, signs and structures. As rendered in my upside down cyanotype photographs, a dingy urban landscape is transformed into images of sublimely cloudy skies. The series' title is taken from one of Asher B. Durand’s Letters on Landscape Painting, a sort of art and nature manifesto for the Hudson River School artists who lamented growing industrialization around the same time that the Gowanus Canal was taking shape.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the project, made on my regular walks over the canal. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century chemical and industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones—a distinction that is no longer possible, if it ever was.

Cloudy #5, Gowanus Canal
2016
cyanotype on Arches hot press paper
10 x 13 1/2 inches

Cloud shadows and drifting vapors is a series of images about the surface of the Gowanus Canal, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of Brooklyn skies, signs and structures. As rendered in my upside down cyanotype photographs, a dingy urban landscape is transformed into images of sublimely cloudy skies. The series' title is taken from one of Asher B. Durand’s Letters on Landscape Painting, a sort of art and nature manifesto for the Hudson River School artists who lamented growing industrialization around the same time that the Gowanus Canal was taking shape.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the project, made on my regular walks over the canal. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century chemical and industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones—a distinction that is no longer possible, if it ever was.

Cloudy #6, Gowanus Canal
2016
cyanotype on Arches hot press paper
10 x 13 1/2 inches

Cloud shadows and drifting vapors is a series of images about the surface of the Gowanus Canal, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of Brooklyn skies, signs and structures. As rendered in my upside down cyanotype photographs, a dingy urban landscape is transformed into images of sublimely cloudy skies. The series' title is taken from one of Asher B. Durand’s Letters on Landscape Painting, a sort of art and nature manifesto for the Hudson River School artists who lamented growing industrialization around the same time that the Gowanus Canal was taking shape.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the project, made on my regular walks over the canal. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century chemical and industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones—a distinction that is no longer possible, if it ever was.

Cloudy #7, Gowanus Canal
2016
cyanotype on Arches hot press paper
10 x 13 1/2 inches

Cloud shadows and drifting vapors is a series of images about the surface of the Gowanus Canal, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of Brooklyn skies, signs and structures. As rendered in my upside down cyanotype photographs, a dingy urban landscape is transformed into images of sublimely cloudy skies. The series' title is taken from one of Asher B. Durand’s Letters on Landscape Painting, a sort of art and nature manifesto for the Hudson River School artists who lamented growing industrialization around the same time that the Gowanus Canal was taking shape.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the project, made on my regular walks over the canal. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century chemical and industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones—a distinction that is no longer possible, if it ever was.

Cloudy #8, Gowanus Canal
2016
cyanotype on Arches hot press paper
10 x 13 1/2 inches

Cloud shadows and drifting vapors is a series of images about the surface of the Gowanus Canal, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of Brooklyn skies, signs and structures. As rendered in my upside down cyanotype photographs, a dingy urban landscape is transformed into images of sublimely cloudy skies. The series' title is taken from one of Asher B. Durand’s Letters on Landscape Painting, a sort of art and nature manifesto for the Hudson River School artists who lamented growing industrialization around the same time that the Gowanus Canal was taking shape.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the project, made on my regular walks over the canal. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century chemical and industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones—a distinction that is no longer possible, if it ever was.

Cloudy #9, Gowanus Canal
2016
cyanotype on Arches hot press paper
10 x 13 1/2 inches

Cloud shadows and drifting vapors is a series of images about the surface of the Gowanus Canal, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of Brooklyn skies, signs and structures. As rendered in my upside down cyanotype photographs, a dingy urban landscape is transformed into images of sublimely cloudy skies. The series' title is taken from one of Asher B. Durand’s Letters on Landscape Painting, a sort of art and nature manifesto for the Hudson River School artists who lamented growing industrialization around the same time that the Gowanus Canal was taking shape.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the project, made on my regular walks over the canal. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century chemical and industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones—a distinction that is no longer possible, if it ever was.

Cloudy #10, Gowanus Canal
2016
cyanotype on Arches hot press paper
18 x 24 inches

Cloud shadows and drifting vapors is a series of images about the surface of the Gowanus Canal, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of Brooklyn skies, signs and structures. As rendered in my upside down cyanotype photographs, a dingy urban landscape is transformed into images of sublimely cloudy skies. The series' title is taken from one of Asher B. Durand’s Letters on Landscape Painting, a sort of art and nature manifesto for the Hudson River School artists who lamented growing industrialization around the same time that the Gowanus Canal was taking shape.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the project, made on my regular walks over the canal. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century chemical and industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones—a distinction that is no longer possible, if it ever was.

Cloudy #11, Gowanus Canal
2016
cyanotype on Arches hot press paper
10 x 13 1/2 inches

Cloud shadows and drifting vapors is a series of images about the surface of the Gowanus Canal, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of Brooklyn skies, signs and structures. As rendered in my upside down cyanotype photographs, a dingy urban landscape is transformed into images of sublimely cloudy skies. The series' title is taken from one of Asher B. Durand’s Letters on Landscape Painting, a sort of art and nature manifesto for the Hudson River School artists who lamented growing industrialization around the same time that the Gowanus Canal was taking shape.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the project, made on my regular walks over the canal. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century chemical and industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones—a distinction that is no longer possible, if it ever was.

Cloudy #12, Gowanus Canal
2016
cyanotype on Arches hot press paper
10 x 13 1/2 inches

Cloud shadows and drifting vapors is a series of images about the surface of the Gowanus Canal, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of Brooklyn skies, signs and structures. As rendered in my upside down cyanotype photographs, a dingy urban landscape is transformed into images of sublimely cloudy skies. The series' title is taken from one of Asher B. Durand’s Letters on Landscape Painting, a sort of art and nature manifesto for the Hudson River School artists who lamented growing industrialization around the same time that the Gowanus Canal was taking shape.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the project, made on my regular walks over the canal. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century chemical and industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones—a distinction that is no longer possible, if it ever was.

Cloudy #14, Gowanus Canal
2016
cyanotype on Arches hot press paper
10 x 13 1/2 inches

Cloud shadows and drifting vapors is a series of images about the surface of the Gowanus Canal, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of Brooklyn skies, signs and structures. As rendered in my upside down cyanotype photographs, a dingy urban landscape is transformed into images of sublimely cloudy skies. The series' title is taken from one of Asher B. Durand’s Letters on Landscape Painting, a sort of art and nature manifesto for the Hudson River School artists who lamented growing industrialization around the same time that the Gowanus Canal was taking shape.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the project, made on my regular walks over the canal. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century chemical and industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones—a distinction that is no longer possible, if it ever was.

Installation view at Gowanus Souvenir Shop, Brooklyn, NY
November 10-27, 2016

Cloud shadows and drifting vapors is a series of images about the surface of the Gowanus Canal, with its floating debris, mucky formations and reflections of Brooklyn skies, signs and structures. As rendered in my upside down cyanotype photographs, a dingy urban landscape is transformed into images of sublimely cloudy skies. The series' title is taken from one of Asher B. Durand’s Letters on Landscape Painting, a sort of art and nature manifesto for the Hudson River School artists who lamented growing industrialization around the same time that the Gowanus Canal was taking shape.

Cyanotype is an early photographic process dating from the 1840s, which results in a blue monochromatic image—the reaction of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to sunlight and water. This process is conceptually linked to the project, made on my regular walks over the canal. It connects the canal’s polluted present to its 19th Century chemical and industrial past. It produces a stripped down image in shades of blue and white, the essential colors of idealized skies and waterways. Its use of this nostalgic image technology alludes to a historically romantic view of untouched landscapes as separate from built ones—a distinction that is no longer possible, if it ever was.